Smartphones, Summer Birth Could Raise Kids' Odds for Nearsightedness

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Kids with summer birthdays, especially those who spend long hours playing on smartphones and tablets, might be at greater risk for vision problems, a new study suggests. Nearsightedness, also called myopia, is on the rise worldwide. It’s what eye doctors call a refractive error, meaning the eyes can’t…

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PTSD Patients Do Best When They Choose Their Treatment

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — When people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) choose their own treatment — be it medication or counseling — they respond better, a new study finds. The study included 200 adult patients, including military veterans and survivors of sexual assault, seen at outpatient clinics in Seattle and Cleveland. They…

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The Bigger the Brain, the Bigger the Tumor Risk?

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The bigger your brain, the greater your risk for a deadly brain cancer, new research from Norway suggests. It’s a matter of math: A large brain means more brain cells, and more cells means more cell divisions that can go wrong and cause mutations that trigger cancer, the…

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Think Genes Dictate Your Life Span? Think Again

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Your life partner has a much greater influence on your longevity than the genes you inherited from your family, according to a new analysis of the family trees of more than 400 million people. “While it is a widely held belief that life span heritability ranges from approximately…

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FDA Takes on Flatulent Cows

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The first drug to combat farting in livestock has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Yes, you read that right: When fed to beef cattle under specific conditions, Experior results in less ammonia gas released by the animals and their waste. “Today we’re announcing the…

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The Sooner You Quit Smoking, the Better

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Despite the well-known dangers of smoking, the sizable benefits of quitting may be overlooked, a new study suggests. “These findings underscore the benefits of quitting smoking within five years, which is a 38 percent lower risk of a heart attack, stroke or other forms of cardiovascular disease,” said…

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HPV Vaccination Rates Continue to Lag in U.S.

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — HPV vaccination rates are still too low to cut cervical cancer cases as much as is possible in the United States, a new report warns. While HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccination has increased in recent years, rates remain well below the federal government’s Healthy People 2020 goal of 80…

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High Blood Pressure in Young Adults Tied to Earlier Strokes

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Two new studies suggest that when people under 40 develop high blood pressure, their risk of early heart disease and stroke go up significantly. The first study found that in a group of about 5,000 young American adults, having high blood pressure was linked to as much as…

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AHA: Meth Use Producing Younger, Harder-to-Treat Heart Failure Patients

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Widespread methamphetamine use is creating a unique form of severe heart failure, according to new research that shows these patients tend to be younger and have poor outcomes. “This is a strikingly different type of patient,” said Dr. Isac Thomas, lead author of the study and an…

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Over 2 Million Americans Have Hepatitis C; Opioids Help Drive Spread

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — More than 2 million Americans have hepatitis C — and the opioid epidemic is a major contributor to the problem, according to a new government study. The study, by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, does highlight progress against the potentially fatal liver disease. It also…

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Who Faces Big Threat From Wildfires? The Answer May Surprise You

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — When wildfires strike, minority communities are especially vulnerable, a new study finds. “A general perception is that communities most affected by wildfires are affluent people living in rural and suburban communities near forested areas,” said study lead author Ian Davies. “But there are actually millions of people who…

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AHA: Stress May Raise Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Women

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Traditional risk factors like obesity, high blood pressure and a sedentary lifestyle may not be the only predictors of type 2 diabetes. New research points to the role that stress may play in the development of the condition in women. The study, being presented Nov. 10 at…

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