More Evidence That Vaping May Help Some Smokers Quit

THURSDAY, June 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) — There’s new research suggesting that a switch over to e-cigarettes can help cigarette smokers kick their habit — even if initially they didn’t intend to. The small British study of 40 people “found that vaping may support long-term smoking abstinence,” lead researcher Dr. Caitlin Notley, of Norwich Medical…

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Parkinson's Meds Tied to Higher Rate of Gambling, Sex Addiction Than Thought

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Compulsive gambling. Shopping until your money has run out. Eating until you’ve grown obese. Relentless sexual risk-taking. Medications that restore normal movement in patients with Parkinson’s disease can unlock their inner demons more often than thought, a new study finds. It’s long been known that the drugs can…

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Does Mental Illness Raise Diabetes Risk?

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Americans with severe mental illness are more than twice as likely to develop type 2 diabetes, and the increased risk is highest among minorities, a new study suggests. Researchers looked at more than 15,000 patients with severe mental illness and found that 28 percent had type 2 diabetes.…

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Smartphone-Obsessed Parents May Mean Cranky Kids

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Parents who take refuge in their smartphones when their kids throw a tantrum may, in the long run, make matters worse, a new study suggests. The study, of 183 couples with young children, found that stressed-out parents often turned to their electronic devices when dealing with their kids.…

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Video Replays Affect Soccer Refs' Thinking

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Anyone watching 2018 World Cup Soccer has to marvel at the referees’ quick thinking. But slow-motion video playbacks may alter their ultimate decision, a new study suggests. Researchers assessed 88 elite soccer referees’ responses to videos of fouls. The refs handed out harsher penalties when they reviewed player…

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AHA: A Daughter's School Lesson Helped Save a Mom's Life

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Christa Murphy was in the bathroom getting ready for work, yet the routine wasn’t going like it should. She kept dropping the soap in the shower. She squeezed globs of toothpaste out of the tube, seemingly everywhere but onto the bristles of her brush. “I started to…

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If Opioid Addicts Survive OD, Other Hazards Lie Ahead: Study

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Survivors of an opioid overdose may consider themselves lucky, but they remain at heightened risk of dying — not just from drugs, but from a host of medical problems or suicide, a new study finds. Compared with the general population, patients who lived through an opioid overdose were…

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When Reconstructing a Breast, Patient's Own Tissue Is Best

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For women who have their breast removed while fighting cancer, using their own tissue for breast reconstruction is better than implants, a new study suggests. More than 60 percent of women who undergo breast removal to treat breast cancer decide to have breast reconstruction, and that rate is…

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70 Sickened So Far in Salmonella-Tainted Melon Outbreak

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A salmonella outbreak linked to melons and fruit salad mixes continues to expand, say officials at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. So far, 70 people have been sickened across seven states after eating fruit salad mixes that included pre-cut watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe and cut…

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When the Heart Stops, Drugs Often to Blame

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — “Hidden” drug overdoses account for nearly 1 in 7 sudden cardiac deaths, a new study contends. Researchers looked at more than 900 people in San Francisco who died of an apparent out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Through autopsies and lab tests, they found that only 541 of those people (59…

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Exercise May Ease Inflammation Tied to Obesity

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Bicycling or other regular exercise may help reduce harmful inflammation in obese people, a new study suggests. Physical activity tames inflammation by changing blood characteristics, according to a team led by Dr. Michael De Lisio, of the University of Ottawa in Canada. Chronic inflammation is behind many of…

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Enlist a Pharmacist to Help Manage High Blood Pressure

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — High blood pressure is one of the biggest risk factors for heart disease and stroke, yet has no symptoms of its own. That’s why having your blood pressure checked regularly is a must, as is controlling it if it’s high. But identifying the right high blood pressure drugs…

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