One Blood Test Might Be Enough to Diagnose Diabetes

TUESDAY, June 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — New research suggests that a single blood test could confirm type 2 diabetes, saving patients time and health care costs. Currently, it’s recommended that a blood test focused on elevated fasting levels of blood sugar (glucose) or a blood component called glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) be confirmed with a…

Details

U.S. Smoking Rate Hits All-Time Low

TUESDAY, June 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Fewer than 14 percent of American adults smoked cigarettes in 2017, the lowest level seen since data collection started in 1965, government health officials reported Tuesday. “Certainly, it is fantastic that the U.S. smoking rates continue to drop,” said Dr. Adam Lackey, chief of thoracic surgery at Staten…

Details

Psychiatric Drug Lithium Tied to Birth Defect Risk

MONDAY, June 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Using the psychiatric drug lithium early in pregnancy may raise the risk of birth defects — but not as much as previously thought, a large new study suggests. Researchers found that women who used lithium during the first trimester were more likely to have a baby with a…

Details

Meds Can Cut Deaths From Opioid Abuse, But Too Few Get Them

MONDAY, June 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Buprenorphine and methadone can cut the chances that someone who survives an opioid overdose will succumb to yet another one, but too few patients get the treatments, a new study shows. “We have two drugs that are lifesaving for people who have had an overdose,” said lead researcher…

Details

America's Poor Are Less Happy Than Ever: Study

MONDAY, June 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Over the past two decades, poor, white Americans have become increasingly unhappy, a new report shows. The same does not appear to be true among their more well-heeled peers, the investigators noted. The findings stem from two mental health surveys conducted in 1995 and 2014. Collectively, the polls…

Details

Mom's Voice: The Sleep Secret for Babies in Intensive Care

MONDAY, June 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The soothing sound of their mother’s voice may help improve sleep for babies in hospital neonatal intensive care units, researchers say. This section of the hospital, called the NICU, provides around-the-clock care to sick or premature babies. But the hospital environment can hinder newborns’ ability to have normal…

Details

Reduce Weight, Reduce the Arthritic Knee Pain

MONDAY, June 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Many aging Americans are both overweight and burdened by arthritis of the knees. New research shows that shedding those excess pounds can mean shedding joint pain, too. “This study adds to the evidence that weight loss is one of the few truly effective nonsurgical measures to reduce pain…

Details

Warning Labels Can Scare Folks Away From Sugary Drinks

TUESDAY, June 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — People are less likely to buy sugary drinks if they see warning labels that include graphic pictures of health consequences such as obesity, diabetes and tooth decay, researchers report. They conducted a study in the cafeteria of a hospital in Massachusetts. Three different types of labels were displayed…

Details

How 'Helicopter' Parenting Impedes a Child's Development

MONDAY, June 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Overcontrolling moms and dads — so-called “helicopter” parents — can stunt their children’s emotional development, new research warns. Directing every move a toddler makes may undermine a child’s ability to manage their emotions and behavior on their own, explained Nicole Perry, lead author of a new study. “We…

Details

AHA: Big Weight Gain in 1st Pregnancy Could Boost Preeclampsia Risk

MONDAY, June 18, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Higher weight gain during pregnancy increases the risk of preeclampsia in women giving birth for the first time, new research shows. The study explored how weight affects preeclampsia, a serious pregnancy condition related to gestational high blood pressure. Ten million women around the world develop preeclampsia each…

Details

U.S. Teens Embracing Alternative Meds. Is That a Healthy Trend?

MONDAY, June 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Alternative medicines — such as herbal products and so-called nutraceuticals — have soared in popularity among American youth, a new report shows. Between 2003 and 2014, the use of alternative medicines doubled, driven largely by increased use of omega-3 fatty acids and melatonin among teens. The findings are…

Details