Armpit Thermometers Helped Spread Dangerous Fungus at UK Hospital

FRIDAY, May 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Armpit thermometers led to a large outbreak of drug-resistant Candida auris fungus in the United Kingdom, researchers say. The outbreak occurred in Oxford University Hospitals’ neurosciences intensive care unit. The culprit: repeat-use axillary thermometers, the kind used to measure body temperature from the armpit. “Despite a bundle of…

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AHA: Poverty Levels Key to States' Performance on Heart Disease

FRIDAY, May 4, 2018 (American Heart Association) — State-by-state disparities in heart disease and stroke are rooted in the economic health of communities and the people who live in them, according to an analysis of a report tracking the impact of cardiovascular disease across the country. Despite a 38 percent overall drop in cardiovascular disease…

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Too Much Social Media May Harm a Woman's Body Image

FRIDAY, May 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest may not be good for women’s self-esteem, a new study suggests. Women are less likely to be happy with their bodies if they spend more than an hour a day on social media, the findings showed. These women tend to think thin people are…

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Care at VA Hospitals as Good or Better Than Elsewhere in U.S.: Report

FRIDAY, May 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The overall quality of care provided by the U.S. Veterans Health Administration is equal to or better than that provided by other health care systems in the United States, a new report says. The Rand Corporation study did find significant variation in quality among individual VA hospitals —…

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U.S. Motorcycle Deaths Dropped 6 Percent Last Year

FRIDAY, May 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Motorcycles are still deadlier than cars, but there’s some good news: Nearly 6 percent fewer bikers died on U.S. roads last year than in 2016, a new report says. Preliminary data indicate that there were 4,990 motorcyclist fatalities in the United States in 2017 — which is 296…

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'Smart Dresser' Might Help Alzheimer's Patients Clothe Themselves

FRIDAY, May 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Dementia can turn even the simple task of getting dressed into a Herculean ordeal. But an experimental automated system called “DRESS” might someday ease that challenge. Using available technology, the system might enable patients to dress themselves without a human assistant. A just completed laboratory trial assessed the…

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Make Your Amusement Park Visits Safe

FRIDAY, May 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Hundreds of millions of people visit U.S. amusement parks every year and take over a billion rides. Serious injuries are few — about one in 24 million. Yet accidents — including fatal accidents — do happen, often because riders didn’t follow safety guidelines or had a pre-existing medical…

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Further Signs That Too Much Sitting Can Raise Clot Risk

THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — It’s been long known that people who sit for extended periods of time run the risk of blood clots. In fact, the condition has been dubbed economy class syndrome because it’s believed it can be brought on by stretches of prolonged immobility on long-distance flights. Now, a new…

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Food for Thought: Keys to Fruitful Fertility

THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — If you’re a woman who’s trying to get pregnant, it might be a good idea to eat more fruit and cut back on fast food. That’s the advice of researchers who conducted a study following nearly 5,600 women in Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Ireland who…

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Device Might Detect Breast Cancer-Linked Swelling Sooner

THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Testing for small changes in the flow of lymph fluids after breast cancer surgery can spot the start of a painful swelling known as lymphedema before it becomes hard to treat, a new study suggests. Evaluating nearly 150 breast cancer patients considered at high risk for lymphedema, researchers…

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The Cold Truth About Migraine Headaches

THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Early humans’ ability to adapt to cold climates may have been helped by a genetic variant that’s common in modern people who live in colder regions — and is linked with migraine headaches, researchers say. Within the last 50,000 years, humans left Africa and colonized cold areas in…

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Scientists Probe Mystery of How Hair Prematurely Goes Gray

THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Sometimes life’s sudden shocks or illnesses can turn hair gray — Barbara Bush, the former first lady who passed away in April, reportedly had her brown hair turn gray as a young mother, following a daughter’s tragic death. But how does premature graying happen? Scientists say new animal…

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