Earlier Mammograms May Mean Less Need for Aggressive Treatments

THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Much of the debate over when to start having mammograms has focused on lives saved, but new research suggests that early screening might also translate into smaller tumors and less aggressive breast cancer treatments. “There are multiple benefits of mammography in terms of early detection. Not only do…

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Sex Still Matters to Many Seniors, Survey Finds

THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — If you think seniors abandon their sex lives as the physical woes of aging descend upon them, a new survey suggests otherwise. The reality is that 40 percent of older Americans still have sex, while 54 percent of older couples still do it, according to a new poll…

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AHA: Paramedics Break Down Door to Save 28-Year-Old Having Stroke

THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (American Heart Association) — When Kevin Duane saw his wife Alyssa sprawled on the floor of their kitchen, surrounded by an EMT crew, he feared she had been attacked in a home invasion. The large goose egg on her forehead prompted police to suspect she was a victim of domestic abuse.…

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Breast Cancer Prognosis May Be Worse If Diagnosis Follows 'Negative' Mammogram

THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — About 15 percent of breast cancers are diagnosed in the interval between regularly scheduled mammograms, where the last mammogram showed no signs of a cancer. Now, new research suggests that these “interval cancers” may have a worse prognosis, especially for younger women. The take-home message is “that we…

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Skin's 'Good' Bacteria May Be Promising Weapon Against Eczema

THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A treatment that harnesses the power of helpful bacteria living naturally on the skin might be a breakthrough treatment for eczema, early research suggests. The therapy capitalizes on recent insights into the importance of the “microbiome” — the trillions of helpful bacteria that live in people’s digestive tracts…

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French Bulldogs: Cute, But Health Issues Abound

THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — French Bulldogs can melt your heart with their wrinkled faces and big ears, but they come with a special set of health problems, a new report warns. The breed is becoming the most popular in the United Kingdom, so researchers at the Royal Veterinary College analyzed data from…

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Simple Drug Packaging Change Could Save Toddlers' Lives

THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — As America’s opioid crisis continues, too many toddlers are accidentally overdosing on narcotic medicines. But a new study suggests that better packaging might curb the problem. Among kids under the age of 6, single-dose packaging prompted a 79 percent decrease in the number of unintentional exposures to a…

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Home Gym: The Benefits of a Cross-Country Ski Machine

THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — When it comes to both fun and efficiency, cross-country skiing is an exhilarating, high-calorie burner. It’s a lot less expensive than downhill skiing — all you need are the skis and a flat, snowy trail. But you can get the same benefits any time of year with a…

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Harms of Banned Pregnancy Drug Linger for Decades in Daughters

WEDNESDAY, May 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women who were exposed to synthetic estrogen (DES) in the womb and developed a rare form of cancer of the vagina and cervix continue to face an increased risk of death, a new study shows. DES was once commonly given to pregnant women because it was believed it…

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First Death Reported in E. Coli Outbreak Tied to Romaine Lettuce

WEDNESDAY, May 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The first death from an ongoing outbreak of E. coli tied to romaine lettuce has been reported in California, federal health officials said Wednesday. The outbreak — tied to lettuce grown in Arizona — has now also spread to half of the 50 states, with 23 more cases…

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Malaria Parasite Is Infecting, Killing U.S. Baby Deer

WEDNESDAY, May 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Parasites that cause malaria in animals — but not humans — are commonly found in deer living in North America, new research shows. Many animals are able to clear these infections, but researchers found that infected baby deer were less likely to survive their first year of life…

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