Take the Ouch Out of Bee Stings

SUNDAY, April 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) — With summer comes the stings of bees and wasps, but one expert has advice on how to keep the pain to a minimum. “The first thing to do is to get the stinger out quickly,” said Dr. Carrie Kovarik. She’s an associate professor of dermatology, dermatopathology and infectious…

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After Age 50, Yearly Eye Checks May Catch Common Cause of Vision Loss

SATURDAY, April 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) — As the U.S. population ages, vision loss caused by age-related macular degeneration is likely to increase, an ophthalmologist says. Adults over 50 should get an annual test for the condition, said Dr. Ingrid Scott, a professor of ophthalmology at Penn State College of Medicine. Blurry or distorted vision…

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Nearly 100 Sickened by E.Coli-Tainted Romaine Lettuce

FRIDAY, April 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The number of illnesses linked to Arizona romaine lettuce tainted with E. coli has risen again, from 84 cases Wednesday to 98 on Friday. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said three more states — Mississippi, Tennessee and Wisconsin — have been hit by the outbreak,…

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College Kids May Be Learning, Even When Checking Smartphones

FRIDAY, April 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Social media use in college classrooms is generally frowned upon. But new research suggests it’s possible to check posts and tweets — and still absorb the lecture material. University of Illinois-Chicago researchers found that social media distraction in the classroom interferes with visual learning, but not auditory learning.…

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Get Fit to Cut Your Diabetes Risk During Pregnancy

FRIDAY, April 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — If she’s fit, a woman is less likely to develop diabetes during pregnancy, a new study contends. Researchers who followed 1,300 U.S. women found that high levels of fitness before pregnancy were tied to a 21 percent lower risk of gestational diabetes. These findings show that women should…

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How Transplanted Livers Guard Against Organ Rejection

FRIDAY, April 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — People who get a liver transplant often require less anti-rejection medication, and new research helps explain why. “This study shows that the liver transplant itself regulates the host’s immune responses. Compared to the other organs, the liver is immunologically a very active organ, so it is capable of…

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With 'Super Gonorrhea' a Threat, Many Still Getting Wrong Antibiotics

FRIDAY, April 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — When an unnamed British man recently contracted a form of “super gonorrhea” resistant to the antibiotics commonly used to treat it, the news spiked concern in doctors and microbiologists worldwide. This week, physicians did cure the man’s sexually transmitted disease using an antibiotic called ertapenem, but they called…

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AHA: Therapy Dogs Like Katie Are Good Medicine After Stroke

FRIDAY, April 27, 2018 (American Heart Association) — When Scott Vande Zande had a serious stroke 15 years ago, his beloved golden retriever Hollie was key to his recovery. “I had to learn to speak again, but there were times I couldn’t talk,” said the Seattle engineer. “I’d come home, and I was so depressed.…

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Posting Your Vacation Online May Make You Forget It

FRIDAY, April 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Over the past decade, smartphones and social media have blanketed the planet like a technological tsunami. The result is that nearly 70 million new photos and 5 billion new posts are uploaded to Instagram and Facebook every day, respectively. But a new study suggests that constantly sharing the…

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Take Online Reviews of Plastic Surgeons With a Grain of Salt

FRIDAY, April 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Online reviews of surgeons who perform cosmetic plastic surgery may be unreliable, researchers say. The researchers examined 1,077 online reviews about breast augmentation surgeons that were posted by people in six large U.S. cities. There were 935 positive and 142 negative reviews. “We found the people who write…

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Outdoor Job? Skin Cancer Can Take a Hefty Toll

FRIDAY, April 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Construction workers, farmers and others who work in the sun are at greater risk for skin cancer, according to researchers. And a new study reveals these job-related cancers cost nations millions in medical expenses. The researchers said lawmakers should address this trend and take steps to reduce job-related…

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