A Better Clot-Buster Drug for Strokes?

THURSDAY, April 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — After a stroke, many patients are given the clot-busting intravenous drug alteplase, but another drug may be more effective, Australian researchers report. Among more than 200 stroke victims, TNKase (tenecteplase) was about twice as effective as alteplase in restoring blood flow to the brain, and it also resulted…

Details

U.S. Women Loosening Up Sexually, Study Shows

THURSDAY, April 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — American women are becoming more frisky in the bedroom, new research reveals. In a study of sexual trends in the United States, researchers at the University of Utah found that promiscuity is rising for women and declining for men. The number of women who’ve had sex with more…

Details

A Doctor's Age May Matter With Emergency Surgery

WEDNESDAY, April 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — If you need an emergency operation, you’re in safer hands with an older surgeon, new research suggests. “These findings provide evidence of a learning curve in surgical practice that has a meaningful impact on patients’ outcomes,” said lead researcher Dr. Yusuke Tsugawa. He’s with the UCLA David Geffen…

Details

Fetal Procedure Prevents Rare Condition That Leaves Kids Unable to Sweat

WEDNESDAY, April 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Doctors say they’ve found a way to head off a rare birth defect that causes babies to be born without functioning sweat glands. By introducing a specific protein into the womb, researchers prevented the defect from taking hold in three children. This is the first and only therapy…

Details

Many Opioid Overdoses May Be Suicides

WEDNESDAY, April 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — As the United States grapples with an ongoing opioid epidemic, experts are calling attention to a hidden aspect of the crisis: Many overdose deaths may, in fact, be suicides. The researchers describe suicide as a “silent contributor” to the nation’s opioid overdose death rate. It’s hard to know…

Details

HIV Drug Appears Safe During Pregnancy

WEDNESDAY, April 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Drugs to prevent HIV-positive pregnant women from infecting their unborn babies appear safe and don’t raise the risk for premature birth or infant death, new research indicates. The U.S. scientists said their findings should ease worries among expectant mothers treated with antiviral regimens that contain the drug tenofovir…

Details

Cases Rise in E. Coli Outbreak Tied to Romaine Lettuce

WEDNESDAY, April 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The number of illnesses linked to Arizona romaine lettuce tainted with E. coli have risen sharply, from 53 cases a week ago to 84 on Wednesday. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that three more states — Colorado, Georgia and South Dakota — have been…

Details

Race Now Plays Smaller Role in Americans' Risk of Dying Young

WEDNESDAY, April 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The racial gap between black and white Americans for dying early has narrowed, but opioid overdose deaths among whites might be fueling part of that otherwise positive trend. The new findings stem from an analysis of death records between 1990 and 2014, which tracked “years of life lost,”…

Details

Restless Legs Linked to Brain Changes

WEDNESDAY, April 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Structural changes in the area of the brain that processes sensations may be linked with restless legs syndrome, a new study suggests. People with restless legs syndrome experience uncomfortable sensations in the legs and a need to move them. It often occurs in the evening and at night,…

Details

Fetal Immune System May Trigger Premature Birth: Study

WEDNESDAY, April 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Most potential explanations of premature birth revolve around the mother, and what might cause her body to reject her developing fetus. But what if it’s the other way around? A new study suggests some preterm births occur because the fetus rejects the mother, after its immune system is…

Details

As Weather Changes, So Do Social Media Posts

WEDNESDAY, April 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Too hot, too cold, too humid: Weather may influence whether or not people post negative comments on social media, researchers report. They compared weather conditions in relation to 2.4 billion Facebook posts and 1.1 billion Twitter posts between 2009 and 2016. And they found a strong association between…

Details

Don't Panic Over 'Dry Drowning' Reports, ER Docs Say

WEDNESDAY, April 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Despite media hype this week around what’s being called “dry drowning,” a group representing U.S. emergency physicians says the water is still safe for kids this summer. Reports of so-called dry drowning have made headlines, and just this week the family of 4-year-old Elianna Grace of Sarasota, Fla.,…

Details