AHA: A Call for Deeper Understanding of AFib

MONDAY, April 16, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Much of what doctors and researchers know about treating atrial fibrillation is based simply on the yes-no question of whether a patient has the condition or not. But this all-too-common heart rhythm disorder is much more complicated than that — and a new scientific statement, published April…

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Overcoming Fear of Back Pain May Spur Recovery

MONDAY, April 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — People with chronic back pain often try painkillers and other treatments without success. Now, a new study suggests a program of education and exercise may provide relief. Helping patients think differently about pain and encouraging them to move in ways they previously feared appears to ease pain and…

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Coffee Safe for Many With Abnormal Heart Rhythms: Review

MONDAY, April 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Caffeine can send the heart racing, but for some people coffee may help prevent abnormal heartbeats, Australian researchers report. Many doctors advise patients with abnormal heart rhythms (“arrhythmias”) to avoid caffeine. But, for most heart patients, coffee and tea are safe and may sometimes reduce the frequency of…

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U.S. Women Less Likely Than Men to Get Statins After Heart Attack

MONDAY, April 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women who survive a heart attack are less likely than men to receive cholesterol-lowering statin drugs that can reduce the risk of another heart attack or stroke, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data on more than 88,000 U.S. adults who filled a statin prescription after a heart…

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Too Much Sitting Could Raise Brain Risks

MONDAY, April 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — There’s been lots of research into how too many hours lounging on chairs and sofas can harm the heart. Now, researchers say all that sitting might be bad for your brain, too. A new study found that too much time spent sitting was correlated with an unhealthy “thinning”…

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New Drugs May Be Big Advance in Lung Cancer Care

MONDAY, April 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Drugs designed to trigger a patient’s immune system may help boost survival for those battling lung cancer, two new studies found. The first study found that when the immunotherapy drug Keytruda (pembrolizumab) was combined with standard chemotherapy, the chance that a patient would die within the next 11…

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Can 'Mono' Virus Up Odds for 7 Other Diseases?

MONDAY, April 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Millions of young Americans have lived through the fatigue and discomfort of mononucleosis. Now, new research suggests, but doesn’t prove, that the virus that causes the illness may be linked to an increased risk for seven other serious immune-system diseases. Those diseases include lupus; multiple sclerosis; rheumatoid arthritis;…

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Love Your Hair Color? You Have Over 100 Genes to Thank.

MONDAY, April 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The color of your hair turns out to be a complicated thing, with a full 124 genes determining whether you wind up a blonde, brunette or redhead. The researchers who pinpointed the origins of hair hue said their findings could improve understanding of health conditions linked to pigmentation,…

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Drug Keytruda May Help Block Melanoma's Return

MONDAY, April 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Taking the drug Keytruda after surgery for advanced melanoma significantly reduced patients’ risk of their cancer returning, a new study found. Last May, Keytruda (pembrolizumab) became the first ever drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to fight cancers based on specific tumor genetics, rather than…

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Foodborne Illnesses Can Mean Financial Ruin for Restaurants

MONDAY, April 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — An outbreak of salmonella at a restaurant can not only make diners sick, it can also be a restaurant’s worst financial nightmare, new research shows. When foodborne illnesses strike, millions are lost in revenue, legal fees and fines, which could force some establishments to close their doors, Johns…

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Smoking Puts Blacks at Higher Risk for Heart Failure

MONDAY, April 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Smoking may significantly increase black Americans’ risk of heart failure, a new study warns. The study included 4,129 black participants who were followed for a median of eight years. Half were followed for a shorter time, half for a longer period. Their average age: 54. When the study…

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How to Keep Anger From Getting the Better of You

MONDAY, April 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Anger isn’t just an emotional reaction — it can affect you physically, too. It’s been shown to raise your risk for heart disease and other problems related to stress — like sleep trouble, digestion woes and headaches. That makes it important, then, to diffuse your anger. Start by…

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