Common Antidepressants in Pregnancy May Alter Fetal Brain Development

MONDAY, April 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Pregnant women who take certain antidepressants may unknowingly compromise the brain development of their child, researchers suggest. The concern is based on a new analysis of brain scans involving nearly 100 newborns, some of whom were born to mothers who took selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) while pregnant.…

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AHA: Asthma as Kid, Stiffer Arteries as an Adult?

MONDAY, April 9, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Having asthma as a child is associated with developing stiff arteries earlier in adulthood, according to a new study. The study, published Monday in the journal Hypertension, sought to explore the link between asthma, a chronic lung disease that makes breathing difficult, and stiff arteries, which is…

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Belly Fat Tied to Lower Kidney Cancer Survival Odds in Women

MONDAY, April 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Belly fat reduces a woman’s chances for surviving kidney cancer, but not a man’s, a new study suggests. The study included 77 women and 145 men with kidney cancer. Half of the women with high amounts of belly fat died within 3.5 years of diagnosis. Meanwhile, more than…

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Reading to Your Kids Might Boost Their Social Skills

SATURDAY, April 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Parents who read to their infants and toddlers may help them develop skills that pay big dividends when they start school, a new study suggests. Specifically, reading aloud and pretend play may offset disruptive behaviors — such as hyperactivity and aggression — and improve attention, researchers found. “When…

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Exercise Cuts Heart Risks, Regardless of Your Genes

MONDAY, April 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Staying physically fit can help ward off heart trouble, even if your genetics put you at higher risk for clogged arteries, a new, large study suggests. The researchers looked at nearly 500,000 middle-aged and older adults and found those with higher fitness levels were less likely to develop…

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COPD Patients May Breathe Easier With Tai Chi

MONDAY, April 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — People struggling with COPD might find some relief in an ancient art. The centuries-old practice of tai chi appears to boost the exercise capabilities and the quality of life of those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a study from Chinese and British researchers suggests. COPD is a…

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What Your Kids Want to Tell You About Social Media

MONDAY, April 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Memo to Mom and Dad: Rein in your screen time. That’s one of the things that kids say they’d like to tell their parents, according to a survey on families’ technology rules and expectations. To better understand the tug of war between parents and children over their electronic…

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Safeguard the Arms of Young Pitchers

SUNDAY, April 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Young baseball pitchers are at risk for overuse injuries, but there are ways to reduce that risk, a sports medicine expert says. “Pitching year-round, inadequate rest between seasons and pitching in multiple leagues all have been linked to an increase in elbow and arm injuries,” said Dr. Eric…

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Looking for Online Advice on Your Heart Device? Beware

SATURDAY, April 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Folks using online message boards to learn more about their heart implant should take any advice they come across with a grain of salt. Researchers report it’s as likely as not the guidance they find will be bogus. About half of the advice related to heart implants found…

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Exercise for High Blood Pressure? Most Not Keen on Idea

SATURDAY, April 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — When it comes to lowering high blood pressure, exercising is pretty much the last thing people want to do, a new survey shows. Much more preferable was popping a pill or sipping a cup of tea every day, the poll of 1,400 people found. The Yale researchers asked…

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Will a Narcissist Steal Your Sweetheart Just for Kicks?

FRIDAY, April 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Narcissists aren’t more likely to pursue partners who are already taken, but it doesn’t stop them, a new study finds. Study leader Amy Brunell wanted to find out if people with narcissistic traits were more likely than others to engage in what she calls “mate poaching.” “I thought…

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Dance Club Scene Rife With Opioid Abuse

FRIDAY, April 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Ecstasy and molly have other deadly company on the club drug scene. A new study finds odds of opioid misuse are higher than average among electronic dance music devotees. Of almost 1,000 EDM partygoers questioned in New York City last summer, about 1 in 10 said they had…

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