Xanax, Valium Tied to Higher Suicide Risk in COPD Patients With PTSD

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — People suffering from two common conditions — post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the breathing disorder known as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) — may be increasing their risk for suicide if they take benzodiazepine drugs, a new study suggests. Benzodiazepines include powerful drugs such as Ativan, Valium and…

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Obesity Surgery May Cut Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Obesity surgery may help prevent heart attacks and strokes in people who are severely overweight and have diabetes, a new large study suggests. It’s already known that obesity surgery can help people shed pounds and better control health conditions like diabetes and high blood pressure. But it has…

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ER Nurses Might Do Better 'Eyeballing' Patients

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — “Eyeballing” emergency room patients may be better than a formal medical assessment in identifying those most in need of urgent care, a new study suggests. Nearly 6,400 patients seeking ER care were assessed over three months. Nurses used an established triage protocol to determine which patients were the…

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New Nerve Stimulation Technique Might Relieve Back Pain

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Stimulating a specific set of nerves that are nestled along the spine may deliver relief to those who suffer from chronic back pain and cut the need for opioid painkillers, new research suggests. The therapy, which targets the root ganglion nerves, is more effective than other spine stimulation…

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Gluten-Free Craze a 'Double-Edged Sword' for Celiac Patients

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The gluten-free diet craze is both reassuring and upsetting to people with celiac disease who are allergic to the nutrient, a small study suggests. People with celiac disease say they’re happy to have more food choices at stores and restaurants. But some with celiac sense a growing stigma…

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Head Blows Without Concussion May Not Damage Brain, Study Claims

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Young football players who suffer repeated head blows — but not concussions — may not sustain brain damage, a new study suggests. For the study, researchers followed 112 football players, aged 9 to 18, during the 2016 season. “We expected repetitive impacts to correlate with worsening neurocognitive [brain]…

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5 Strength-Training Mistakes to Avoid

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Developing lean muscle mass is important for everyone — it can keep you active and independent throughout your life. But to maximize the benefits of strength training, make sure you’re not making these common mistakes. Mistake number 1: Letting momentum drive your workout. If you power through repetitions…

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Countries That Ban Spanking See Less Teen Violence: Study

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Nations that officially frown upon hitting kids as a form of punishment appear to have teens who are less prone to violence, new research suggests. In countries that have a complete ban on corporal punishment (spanking and slapping), the rates of physical fighting among teens are as much…

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Facebook Posts May Hint at Depression

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — People may rely on social media such as Facebook to showcase the highlights of their lives, like vacations. But new research suggests the language they use in posts might also help predict depression. Using sophisticated software, researchers were able to scan social media posts and detect depression months…

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Push-Button Pain Meds Curb Need for Opioids After C-Section: Study

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Letting women who’ve had a cesarean section dispense and control pain medication through a catheter reduces their use of addictive oral opioid painkillers, researchers report. Their study included 576 women who had planned C-sections. In such cases, it’s common to inject a local anesthetic and a small dose…

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Your Gut May Be to Blame for Your Bloodstream Infection

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Bloodstream infections contracted during a hospital stay are usually caused by a patient’s own digestive tract, not a doctor’s dirty hands or another patient’s cough, a small new study suggests. Stanford University researchers used new computer software to quickly identify the source of bloodstream infections among 30 patients.…

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White House Wants Prices in Drug Ads, But Big Pharma Fights Back

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — In an attempt to head off federal regulation, America’s pharmaceutical manufacturers announced Monday that they would take voluntary action to make drug prices more transparent. Under the industry’s plan, all TV drug advertisements would include information directing consumers to online resources that provide the drug’s list price, estimated…

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