Early Birds May Have Lower Breast Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women who love the early hours of the day are less likely to develop breast cancer, a new study suggests. British researchers analyzed two data banks that included more than 409,000 women to investigate the link between sleep traits and breast cancer risk. Compared to night owls, women…

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He Lost His Son at Sandy Hook — Now He Wants You to Know the Warning Signs

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — As Mark Barden let go of the hand of his young son, Daniel, and the boy boarded the bus for school on the morning of Dec. 14, 2012, he had no idea it would be the last time he would see his child alive. Hours later, the 7-year-old…

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Navigating New Parent Nerves

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A newborn can bring a sense of fulfillment to your life … and an equal amount of stress over everything from baby’s health to your own parenting skills. A few simple strategies can help both mom and dad relax. First, expect to feel many different, often contradictory emotions.…

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Fewer Late-Stage Kidney Deaths After Obamacare: Study

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — End-stage kidney disease patients on dialysis are among those benefiting from Obamacare’s expansion of Medicaid, with related deaths declining in states that increased the program’s enrollment, research suggests. Researchers followed more than 230,000 non-elderly kidney failure patients undergoing dialysis treatment in the United States between 2011 and 2017.…

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AHA: Postpartum Depression May Raise Heart Risks

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Otherwise healthy women diagnosed with postpartum depression may be at higher risk of a heart attack, stroke or heart failure, a new study suggests. Acting on mounting evidence linking clinical depression to cardiovascular disease, researchers sought to explore whether other forms of depression might also increase the…

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Fewer Pregnant U.S. Women Smoke or Drink, But More Are Using Pot

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Over the past two decades, the percentage of U.S. women who say they’ve smoked or drank during a pregnancy has fallen, but the percentage who say they’ve used marijuana has nearly doubled, a new report finds. Between 2002 and 2016, the percentage of pregnant women ages 18 to…

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AHA: Vaping May Do Your Heart No Favors

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (American Heart Association) — New research shows that electronic cigarettes contain chemicals that cause heart damage, adding to the growing list of concerns about their safety. The study, which will be presented Nov. 12 at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions meeting in Chicago, investigated the effect that e-cigarettes have on…

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Hookah Pipes Far From Harmless, Study Warns

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Smoking a hookah may be as damaging to blood vessels as smoking cigarettes, a new study suggests. Hookahs, also known as water pipes, have been touted as a harmless alternative to cigarettes, but researchers found that blood vessels were affected in the same way. In addition, when hookah…

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A Single Energy Drink Might Harm Blood Vessels: Study

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Caffeine-laden energy drinks are popular, but they might make your blood vessels less efficient, a small study suggests. These drinks — sold as Monster and Red Bull, to name two — have been linked to heart, nerve and stomach problems, researchers say. “A lot of young kids use…

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Global Melanoma Deaths Up Among Men, But Not Women

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Melanoma skin cancer death rates in men are on the rise in most countries, but are stable or declining for women in some, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed World Health Organization data from 33 countries between 1985 and 2015. Melanoma death rates in men were increasing…

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Daylight Saving Time Tied to Rise in A-Fib Hospitalizations

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — When Americans set clocks an hour ahead in the spring for Daylight Saving Time, hospitalizations rise for people with a common type of irregular heartbeat, a new study finds. Atrial fibrillation affects at least 3 million Americans and possibly twice that many. Its main danger is an increased…

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Noisy Neighborhood? Your Heart May Pay a Price

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Living in noise-saturated neighborhoods might be more than simply annoying, with new research suggesting it seems to raise the risk for serious heart problems. Chronic noise from traffic and airports appears to trigger the amygdala, a brain region critically involved in stress regulation, brain scans have revealed. Noise…

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