Boy Who Died 450 Years Ago Gives Clues to Hepatitis Research

THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The mummified remains of an Italian boy who died 450 years ago suggest the hepatitis B virus has infected humans for centuries. The child died in the 16th century. And prior testing suggested smallpox killed him. But a new analysis evaluated DNA samples from the boy’s bone and…

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More U.S. Women Obese Before Pregnancy, Experts Sound the Alarm

THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Prepregnancy weights continue to rise in the United States, with less than half of women at a healthy size before conception, U.S. health officials report. Pregnancy experts fear this trend may threaten the health of mothers and their babies. “As the American population increases in size, we are…

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U.S. Cancer Deaths Steadily Dropping: Report

THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Better cancer detection and treatments, not to mention lots of people quitting smoking, have fueled a 20-year drop in deaths from the disease, a new report shows. That means more than 2 million lives have been saved, the American Cancer Society statistics indicate. “It’s pretty staggering that 2.4…

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Diabetics May Often Fare Poorly in Hospice Care

THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Decisions about diabetes care can become harder as people age, and that may be especially true for those needing hospice care. A new study has found that, among people getting hospice care in a nursing home, diabetes care may lead to higher rates of dangerous low blood sugar…

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Keep Your New Year's Resolutions, Lower Your Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — People who stick to their New Year’s resolutions to be healthier this year might not just feel better but also reduce their risk for cancer, a new study suggests. In fact, their chances of developing cancer could drop by 33 percent, the researchers said. “The take-home message is…

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Goodbye, Needles? Patch Might Be the Future for Blood-Sugar Tracking

THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Developers of a new patch hope to eliminate a big barrier in type 2 diabetes treatment — painful finger-sticks and injections. The new patch — which actually uses an array of tiny needles that researchers promise are pain-free — senses when blood sugar levels are rising and then…

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Most U.S. Babies Start Solid Foods Too Soon

THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — More than half the parents in the United States start feeding their babies solid foods before they’re 6 months old — the age now recommended by health experts, a new study indicates. Introducing solid foods or new drinks too early could deprive them nutritionally, the researchers warned. Waiting…

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Need Motivation to Exercise? Try the Buddy System

THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Exercising with a buddy can give you both mental and fitness boosts. In fact, under the right conditions, the intensity and duration of exercise among workout partners can be more than twice that of solo efforts, according to research led by Kansas State University’s Dr. Brandon Irwin. Here’s…

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Stem Cell Transplant Shows Promise for Immune Disorder Scleroderma

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Stem cell transplants could offer new hope for people with a severe form of scleroderma — a debilitating and deadly condition that affects the immune system, a new study suggests. “Scleroderma hardens the skin and connective tissues and, in its severe form, leads to fatal organ failure, most…

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Can Caffeine Levels in Blood Predict Parkinson's?

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The way your body processes your morning cup of coffee might indicate whether or not you have Parkinson’s disease, a new study says. Japanese researchers found that low levels of caffeine were more common in people with Parkinson’s disease than in those without the disorder, even if they…

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Millennials Increasingly Strive for Perfection

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Perfectionism has reached new heights among young people, a new study suggests. This intense desire to succeed could take a toll on their mental health, the researchers speculated. The findings come from an analysis of data on more than 40,000 American, Canadian and British college students who completed…

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Hysterectomy May Have Long-Term Health Risks

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women who undergo a hysterectomy are at greater risk for heart disease and other health issues — even if they keep their ovaries, new research suggests. “Hysterectomy is the second most common gynecologic surgery, and most are done for benign reasons, because most physicians believe that this surgery…

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