Did Neanderthal DNA Help Early Humans Fend Off Disease?

THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Mating with Neanderthals helped boost modern humans’ ability to fight novel viruses in Europe and Asia, a new study contends. Before vanishing about 40,000 years ago, Neanderthals interbred with modern humans who had migrated out of Africa. As a result, many modern Europeans and Asians have about 2…

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Low-Dose Aspirin May Protect Against Ovarian Cancer: Study

THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Regular use of low-dose aspirin may the reduce risk of ovarian cancer, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed data from more than 205,000 American women and found that those who reported recent, regular use of low-dose aspirin (defined as 100 milligrams or less) had a 23 percent lower…

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AHA: Researchers Suggest New Way to Possibly Eliminate Clogged Arteries

THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Researchers have proposed a unique study in humans to reduce the early onset of atherosclerosis, the buildup of the artery-clogging plaque that can lead to heart attacks and strokes. The report, published Oct. 4 in the Journal of the American Heart Association, reviews a host of previous…

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Why Printed Calorie Counts at Restaurants Are Important

THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — May 7, 2018 marked a milestone for public health in the United States. It’s the date that mandatory nutrition and calorie information took effect for most chain restaurants, enabling consumers to compare menu items before ordering and, hopefully, make smarter choices. Some cities across the country had already…

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A Couple's Tough Trek Back From Opioid Addiction

THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — In 2016, almost 174 Americans died each day due to drug overdoses — and roughly two-thirds of those deaths were caused by opioid drugs. The statistics are startling and make the problem seem hopeless. But is it? Beating drug addiction — whether it’s opioids (such as OxyContin), methamphetamine…

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Path to Obesity May Start in Preschool

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Preschoolers who quickly pack on pounds may be at particular risk of becoming obese teenagers, a large new study finds. Experts said the results point to a critical “window” in early childhood — between the ages of 2 and 5 or 6 years — that can set the…

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How Much He Sleeps May Affect His Stroke Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Getting too little or too much sleep can affect stroke risk, depending on a man’s race, researchers say. “These results suggest that short and long sleep duration may have different consequences for people depending on race and sex,” said study author Virginia Howard, from the University of Alabama…

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Alzheimer's Gene Tied to 'Chemo Brain' in Breast Cancer Survivors

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Many older breast cancer patients might worry that they will be struck by “chemo brain” after their treatments, but a new study suggests that only those who carry a gene linked to Alzheimer’s face that risk. Researchers found that breast cancer survivors carrying the APOE4 gene who underwent…

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Science Says 'Hug It Out'

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Hugs. Everyone knows they feel good, but new research shows they really can take the edge off of interpersonal conflicts. Assessing more than 400 adults, scientists found that getting a hug on the day of a conflict was linked to smaller drops in positive emotions and a smaller…

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AHA: Doctors Could Do More to Help Smokers With Poor Circulation

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Doctors are not doing nearly enough to help peripheral artery disease patients quit smoking, a key risk factor for the disease, a new study shows. The study, published Oct. 3 in the Journal of the American Heart Association, took a close look at the relationship between smoking…

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Acne's Stigma Can Take a Big Mental Toll

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The impact of acne is more than skin-deep, and often disrupts sleep and well-being, scientists have found. Researchers in Ireland report that perceived social stigma diminishes quality of life for many who have acne — especially girls and women. “We know from previous research that many acne sufferers…

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AHA: After 2 Heart Attacks, She May Need a New Heart — But First Comes Her Wedding

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (American Heart Association) — On her way to watch her beloved Kansas City Chiefs play in 2016, Leah Huss felt sensations far different from the usual pre-game jitters. There was shortness of breath. And a heaviness in the left side of her chest. Worse yet, those feelings were awfully familiar. Seven…

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