Three New Genes Linked to Chronic Back Pain

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — New research pinpoints three genes responsible for skeletal development that appear to be connected to chronic back pain. The study authors said their findings could shed new light on the biological factors involved in the development of the condition and lead to new treatments for back pain, which…

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Therapeutic Vaccine Shows Promise Against a Range of Cancers

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A personalized vaccine held an aggressive group of cancers in check among more than half of patients who received it in a small, preliminary trial, researchers report. HER2-positive cancers are cancers that have too much of the HER2 protein on their surface. In that setting, a cancer can…

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Sleepy Teens More Prone to Drug Use, Suicide Attempts

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — High school students who get too little sleep are more likely than others to use drugs, drink alcohol or attempt suicide, U.S. researchers warn. And while teenagers need eight to 10 hours of sleep nightly, only 30 percent of students report getting that amount, according to survey data…

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Drinking Enough Water Could Be Key to Avoiding UTIs

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women plagued by recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) may look no farther than their kitchen tap for relief, a new study suggests. Researchers found that women who drank plenty of water had a significant reduction in their odds for a recurrence of the common infections. “This study provides…

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'Yo-Yo' Cardio Readings May Signal Heart Risks

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — If your weight, blood pressure, cholesterol or blood sugar levels fluctuate, you may have a higher risk of heart attack, stroke and premature death than people with more steady readings, new research suggests. According to the study, during nearly six years of follow-up, men and women whose readings…

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Colds Especially Bad? Your Nose Might Be to Blame

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For people suffering from a cold, the severity of their symptoms may be linked to the mix of bacteria that inhabit their nose. New research suggests the amount and type of organisms residing in the nose might explain why some people’s symptoms are worse than others — even…

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3 Ways to Tame Food Temptations

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Losing weight often comes down to changing the patterns and habits that led to overeating. And that usually takes self-control, or the ability to resist temptation. Think of self-control as the inner voice that keeps you from indulging in high-calorie food and prompts you to stick to your…

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Doctors Use Bacteria as Weapon Against Cancer

SUNDAY, Sept. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) — It’s a perfect case of the enemy of my enemy is my friend. A potentially dangerous bacteria appears to target malignant cells and could provide a new means of fighting cancer, a small, preliminary study reports. The bacteria, Clostridium novyi-NT, can cause gas gangrene and sepsis if infection…

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Lawn Mowers Can Be an Accident Waiting to Happen

SATURDAY, Sept. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Mowing your lawn can be a dangerous job, resulting in severe injury or even the loss of a limb. A new review of 51,000 lawn mower injuries between 2006 and 2013 found that 85 percent of the injuries were to men. Moreover, children up to age 4 were…

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Just Witnessing School Violence Can Leave Psychic Scars

FRIDAY, Sept. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For middle school students, witnessing school violence can be as bad as being bullied, new research suggests. An international team of researchers found that young witnesses face many of the same challenges later on as those who are direct victims of campus violence. Notably, eighth-grade witnesses are at…

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Patients Want Breast Cancer Costs Upfront

FRIDAY, Sept. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The cost of breast cancer treatment rarely comes up in doctor-patient discussions — but most patients wish it would, researchers report. “Doctors and patients should be open to discussing the financial implications of treatment,” said study author Dr. Rachel Greenup, of the Duke Cancer Institute in Durham, N.C.…

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Smoked, Vaped, Eaten: U.S. Teens Use Pot in Many Ways

FRIDAY, Sept. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) — American teens are partaking of pot in any way they can, from smoking to vaping to eating marijuana edibles, new research shows. The study, of Los Angeles-area high school students, found that about one-third had ever used marijuana. And most of them had used it in more than…

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