Overweight in Pregnancy? Here's How to Keep Excess Pounds at Bay

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Heather Kinion never spent much time thinking about her weight. But when she got pregnant, that changed. “My sister had a baby a few years before me and had gained a bunch of weight, and she still hadn’t lost it when I got pregnant,” Kinion said. So the…

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Genes May Control How Tough It Is to Stop Drinking

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — When they give up booze, some alcoholics have more severe withdrawal symptoms than others. This discrepancy may come down to genetics, researchers say. The Yale University team hopes its findings ultimately lead to treatments that ease the discomfort of “detox.” Heavy drinkers can develop shakes, nausea, headaches, anxiety…

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Experimental Vaccine Shows Promise in Preventing TB

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Tuberculosis remains the most lethal of infectious diseases worldwide, killing more than 1.6 million people a year. But researchers say a new vaccine might prevent half of full-blown illnesses in infected people who receive the shot. “We found that the incidence of pulmonary tuberculosis was significantly lower” for…

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Antibiotics May Cure Appendicitis — No Operation Needed

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — If you’re suffering from acute appendicitis, you might be successfully treated with antibiotics and never need an operation to remove your appendix, Finnish researchers report. Most appendicitis cases are uncomplicated, which simply means the organ hasn’t ruptured, so they can be treated with antibiotics. Only when the appendix…

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Scientists Developing Blood Test for Drowsy Driving

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Here’s a welcome alert: Scientists say they’re inching closer to a blood test for drowsy driving. A computer algorithm effectively differentiated between sleep-deprived and well-rested people by picking up changes in expression of certain genes, British researchers report. “Identifying these biomarkers is the first step to developing a…

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Consumer Reports Says Warnings About Tainted Beef Don't Go Far Enough

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — To avoid possible E. coli infection, check your freezer and toss out any ground beef bought in the United States between June 21 and July 11, food safety advocates advise. Consumer Reports believes U.S. regulators didn’t go far enough in their response to a deadly E. coli outbreak…

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Exercise May Delay Rare Form of Alzheimer's

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Regular exercise might delay a rare form of early onset Alzheimer’s disease, a new study suggests. Researchers found that 2.5 hours of walking or other physical activity a week thwarted mental decline tied to autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease (ADAD). This is an inherited form of disease that leads…

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Short Bout of Exercise Might Boost Your Memory

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Just a little bit of light exercise can immediately improve a person’s memory, new Japanese research suggests. How little? The small study involved 36 healthy college-aged men and women and found that just 10 minutes of relaxed cycling on a stationary bike was all it took to improve…

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Gun Victims More Likely to Die Than Other Trauma Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Gunshot wounds are far deadlier than other types of trauma, according to a new study. Gunshot victims are five times more likely to need a blood transfusion. They also require 10 times more blood units than people involved in falls, car accidents, stabbings or other assaults, according to…

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Gender 'Nonconformity' Takes Mental Toll on Teens

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — American teens whose behavior, appearance or lifestyle do not conform to widely held views on what it is to be a “normal” male or female face a high risk for mental distress and drug abuse, new research warns. The findings were culled from a national survey exploring the…

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Coffee Shop Workers on Front Lines of Opioid Crisis

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — New research suggests that employees in coffee shops and fast food places can be trained to respond to opioid overdoses at their places of business. “Because opioid overdoses may occur in public bathrooms, business managers and staff unwittingly become first responders. Providing training to service industry employees on…

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