4 Habits That Lead to Better Food Choices

MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The choices you make every day, both big and small, influence your weight and your health. For instance, do you grab coffee and a donut for breakfast or opt for yogurt with fresh fruit? Understanding why you make the choices you do and how to improve those choices…

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Acing Intro to College Life

SUNDAY, Sept. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Starting college can be daunting, but there are a number of things new students can do to ease into this experience, a psychologist suggests. “As freshman — and their parents — begin the first semester of college, it’s important to realize that not all learning takes place in…

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Tennis Skills Decline Equally in Male, Female Pros

SATURDAY, Sept. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) — With the U.S. Open championship set to conclude Sunday in New York City, a new study shows that male and female professional tennis players have the same rate of age-related declines in physical ability. This was a surprising finding because men and women have different patterns of aging,…

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Black Patients Have 5 Times the Rate of Blood Pressure Crises

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A sudden, severe surge in blood pressure is known as a hypertensive crisis, and new research suggests that black people are far more likely to experience this potentially deadly condition. High blood pressure “is an unnecessary scourge on African Americans. The prevalence of hypertensive crisis is five times…

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Naloxone Nasal Spray Works Best to Stop Opioid OD: Study

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A one-step nasal spray is the easiest form of naloxone to give someone suffering an opioid overdose, researchers say. Increased public availability of naloxone, also known by the brand name Narcan, is considered a key way to reduce opioid overdose deaths. But there’s more than one way to…

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AHA: Nicotine Patch Safe for Smokers Hospitalized With Heart Trouble

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Nicotine replacement therapy appears to be a safe option for smokers hospitalized for heart disease, even for critically ill patients on their first day, according to a new study. Researchers hope the findings will encourage doctors to prescribe nicotine patches or other replacement therapies more often during…

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Poor Health Care Linked to 5 Million Deaths Worldwide a Year

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Poor-quality health care results in about 5 million deaths a year in low- and middle-income countries, new research suggests. And another 3.6 million deaths a year are caused by lack of access to care, the study found. “Quality care should not be the purview of the elite, or…

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Exercise Doesn't Affect Timing of Menopause, Study Finds

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — New research seems to settle the question of whether there’s a link between how much a woman works out and her risk of early menopause. The conclusion? There is no link. Previous studies have produced conflicting results, with some suggesting that very active women may be at lower…

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AHA: 'Gronk Girl' Tackles Her Second Heart Transplant in 5 Years

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Now that she’s on her third heart, Lauren Meizo knows a good deal about how to live for months in a hospital room, about how her internal organs work together, about how to be patient and tenacious during long periods of recovery. She’s also learned a lot…

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Urgent Care Centers Ease ER Burden in U.S.

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For minor ills such as sore throats, privately insured Americans increasingly use urgent care centers rather than hospital emergency rooms, a new study finds. Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston analyzed 2008-2015 data from Aetna, the commercial health insurance company. “The drop in emergency department visits…

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Sleep Apnea Often Missed in Black Americans

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Sleep apnea is common — but rarely diagnosed — among black Americans, researchers say. The new study included 852 black men and women, average age 63, in Jackson, Miss., who were participants in the Jackson Heart Sleep Study. The investigators found that 24 percent of the study participants…

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LGBT Americans Typically Poorer Than Straight Peers: Study

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — LGBT people in the United States are more likely than their straight counterparts to be poor, and this is especially true for women, a new study says. Wealth plays a key role in health and well-being, and it’s one factor in the poorer health for this group that…

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