AHA: 'Bad' Cholesterol Can Be Deadly in Otherwise Healthy People

MONDAY, Aug. 20, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Healthy people with a low risk of cardiovascular disease may still need to keep a close eye on their cholesterol, according to new research. A study, published recently in the journal Circulation, found that otherwise healthy people with high LDL cholesterol levels are at higher risk of…

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Doctors Not Talking About Newer Meningitis Vaccine

MONDAY, Aug. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Many U.S. doctors aren’t telling teenaged patients and their parents about a newer vaccine for potentially deadly bacterial meningitis infections, a new study finds. Bacterial meningitis is an infection of the brain and spinal cord. It is uncommon in the United States, but sporadic outbreaks occur — often…

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Most Parents Say Tsk, Tsk to Tattoos for Their Teens

MONDAY, Aug. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Most American parents would forbid their teen from getting a tattoo due to concerns about possible infection and future job prospects, a nationwide survey finds. The poll of more than 1,000 parents found 78 percent said they would not let their 13- to 18-year-old get inked. About half…

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2 in 5 Teens Text While Driving, Survey Shows

MONDAY, Aug. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Nearly 40 percent of teen drivers in the United States say they text while driving, a new survey finds. Researchers analyzed survey data from teen drivers aged 14 and older in 35 states and found that more than a third said they’d texted while driving at least once…

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What Comes First: Warm-Up or Stretching?

MONDAY, Aug. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Sports-medicine research has called into question the value of warm-ups and cool-downs, and cast doubt on whether they really prevent muscle soreness. However, there are still other benefits to these pre- and post-workout steps, and to stretching after both. But it’s important to get the sequence right. A…

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Vaping Can Damage DNA, But Will It Cause Cancer?

MONDAY, Aug. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — E-cigarettes produce chemicals that can damage a person’s DNA, the first step on a path that might lead to cancer, a new study reports. The saliva of a small group of e-cigarette users contained increased levels of three DNA-damaging compounds, the researchers said. These chemicals are formaldehyde, acrolein…

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4 Ways to Protect Your Child From Allergic Reactions at School

SUNDAY, Aug. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — If your child has a food allergy, safety prevention belongs at the top of your back-to-school checklist. “Ensuring that parents and school personnel are all on the same page as far as preventing exposures and treating symptoms is critical to keeping food-allergic children safe,” said Dr. B.J. Lanser,…

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A Wilderness Expert's Keys to Safety in the Great Outdoors

SATURDAY, Aug. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Some simple steps can reduce danger when you venture into the great outdoors, an expert says. “Knowing your limits, not trying to do too much, knowing where you’re going and what you might encounter there and being aware of the environment you’re in are the best ways to…

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Is a Haywire Body Clock Tied to Mood Disorders?

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — There may be a genetic link between mood disorders and the body’s internal clock, a new study suggests. Research published earlier this year linked disruptions in the body clock (circadian rhythms) with an increased risk of mood issues such as depression and bipolar disorders. In this new study,…

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More Opioid Users Getting Treatment Since Medicaid Expansion

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The expansion of Medicaid that came along with the Affordable Care Act has made it easier for some opioid users to get treatment, new research suggests. In a study of nearly 12 million Medicaid patients, researchers found that while the number of prescriptions for opioid painkillers decreased slightly,…

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Genetic Testing for Cancer Lacking for Women on Medicare: Study

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Testing for gene mutations linked to breast and ovarian cancer is rare among some Medicare patients who have the cancers and qualify for such tests, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from 12 southeastern states between 2000 and 2014. Only 8 percent of 92 women who met…

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