Get Dizzy Upon Standing? It Could Be Sign of Dementia Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Are you a middle-aged person who tends to feel a little woozy when you stand up? If so, new research suggests you might need to worry more than most about developing dementia later in life. The study focused on a condition called orthostatic hypotension — where blood pressure…

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Sleeping Pills May Be Poor Choice for Dementia Patients

WEDNESDAY, July 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Giving dementia patients sleeping pills might raise their risk of broken bones, a new study suggests. Researchers compared data from nearly 3,000 dementia patients who took the commonly prescribed sleep drugs zolpidem, zopiclone and zaleplon (so-called Z-drugs) and nearly 1,700 dementia patients who did not take the drugs.…

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Virtual Reality as a Window Into Dementia

WEDNESDAY, July 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Virtual reality might one day help train medical students how to best care for dementia patients, a new study suggests. Researchers used virtual reality simulations to help prepare about 20 high school students in Chicago to interact with seniors with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia in an…

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Intensive Blood Pressure Control May Help Preserve Brain Health

WEDNESDAY, July 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Strict blood pressure control not only benefits your heart, it might also help save your brain, preliminary research suggests. Older adults whose systolic blood pressure (the top number in a reading) was kept at 120 mm Hg or less saw a 19 percent decrease in their risk for…

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Your Sunscreen May Not Be as Protective as You Think

WEDNESDAY, July 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Many people apply sunscreen too thinly, and that could mean far less sun protection than they hoped for, new research shows. So, it might be a good idea to use sunscreens with a higher sun-protection factor (SPF) to begin with, the British researchers advised. “What this research shows…

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AHA: After a Heart Attack, Return to Work Can Be Good Medicine

WEDNESDAY, July 25, 2018 (American Heart Association) — After five weeks off recovering from her heart attack, Melissa Murphy looked forward to returning to her job. “I’m back out, and I’m contributing again,” the Iowa mother of two remembered thinking. “I’m not a victim, which is how you sometimes feel when you’re sitting on your…

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You Have 11 Seconds to Tell Your Doc What's Wrong

WEDNESDAY, July 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Eleven seconds. That’s how long you typically have to tell your doctor what’s wrong with you before he or she interrupts you and possibly sidetracks the conversation, a new study shows. “These findings are obviously concerning. We would like our physicians to listen for more than 11 seconds,”…

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Opioids Before Joint Replacement Tied to Worse Recovery

WEDNESDAY, July 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Prolonged use of opioid painkillers before total knee or hip replacement may greatly increase a patient’s risk of repeat surgery and hospitalization, a new study says. Opioid use should be considered yet another risk factor for surgeons and patients to consider before elective joint replacement, wrote lead researcher…

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Stress Won't Undermine Fertility Treatment Success: Study

THURSDAY, July 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Struggles with infertility can take an emotional toll. But a new study finds the stress that a woman often experiences during infertility treatment won’t limit her chances of success. The analysis looked at 20 studies that explored the stress surrounding infertility, a condition that touches millions of women…

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Are You Car Seat Savvy?

WEDNESDAY, July 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — You know that wearing seat belts and putting kids in appropriate car seats can save lives, but are you doing all you can to make your car a safe environment for little ones? Hundreds of thousands of car seats are recalled for safety defects every year, with more…

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Treating Depression May Prevent Repeat Heart Attack

TUESDAY, July 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — It’s common for heart attack survivors to develop depression. Now a new trial has found that antidepressant treatment may help those patients avoid a second heart attack. The study, of 300 heart patients with depression, found that treatment with the antidepressant escitalopram (Lexapro) almost halved the risk of…

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Blood Sugar Spikes Seen in Seemingly Healthy People

TUESDAY, July 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — You’d expect big blood sugar fluctuations in people with diabetes. But for those without the disorder, blood sugar levels should remain fairly stable, right? Maybe not, says a new study. Researchers found some people who don’t have diabetes still have wild swings in their blood sugar levels after…

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