Later-Life Fractures Up Risk of Early Death

FRIDAY, July 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A broken bone in older age may increase your risk of death for the next 10 years, researchers say. “A fracture is the starting point for much wider health issues that persist long after the fracture has healed, and can ultimately result in earlier death,” said study author…

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Daily Low-Dose Aspirin May Be Weapon Against Ovarian Cancer

FRIDAY, July 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — One low-dose aspirin a day could help women avoid ovarian cancer or boost their survival should it develop, two new studies suggest. In fact, daily low-dose aspirin — the type many older women already take to help their hearts — was tied to a 10 percent reduction in…

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Could Botox Cousin Combat the Opioid Epidemic?

FRIDAY, July 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A modified type of botulinum toxin — botox — gave mice long-term pain relief and may someday be a safer alternative to opioids as a treatment for chronic pain, according to British researchers. They “deconstructed” the botulinum molecule and reassembled it with an opioid called dermorphin. The resulting…

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Air Pollution at National Parks Keeps Visitors Away

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Fresh air is in short supply at U.S. national parks, a new study shows. Researchers found that from 1990 to 2014, average concentrations of ozone air pollution in 33 of the nation’s largest national parks were the same as in the 20 largest cities in the country. Despite…

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Where Are Opioid Painkillers Prescribed the Most?

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A close look at U.S. congressional districts has yielded new information about the opioid crisis: The highest rates of prescriptions for opioid painkillers are in the Southeast, Appalachia and the rural West. Focusing on prescribing rates for opioids like Oxycontin in congressional districts could help improve efforts to…

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Affected by the Valsartan Heart Drug Recall? Here's What to Do

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — After the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced last week that certain brands of blood pressure medicines contained a carcinogen and were being recalled, many patients may wonder what’s next for their cardiovascular care. The FDA said it mandated the recall because valsartan medicines from a Chinese manufacturer,…

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In the ICU, Patients' Relatives Often Mum About Care Concerns

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Many family members of intensive care unit (ICU) patients are reluctant to tell medical staff of worries about their loved one’s care, a new study finds. “Speaking up is a key component of safety culture, yet our study — the first to our knowledge to address this issue…

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More U.S. Teens Shunning Drugs, Alcohol

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Over the last four decades, more American teenagers have decided to say no to drugs and alcohol, a new report shows. “There has been a steady increase in the proportion of students graduating high school who report never having tried alcohol, marijuana, tobacco or any other drugs,” said…

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Your Earliest Memories May Be False

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Can you trust your very first childhood memories? Maybe not, a new study suggests. People’s earliest memories are typically formed around 3 to 3.5 years of age, past research has shown. But in a survey of more than 6,600 people, British scientists found that 39 percent of participants…

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AHA: Stroke Survivor's Tattoo Gets People Talking

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Scars are a natural sign of healing, but not every physical trauma leaves a visible reminder. The only outward sign that 27-year-old Skylar Doerwaldt is a stroke survivor is of her choosing: a tattoo on her left forearm. The dark, jagged lines represent the arteries in her…

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Adrenaline Shot Can Save Lives After Heart Stops, But at a Heavy Price

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — An adrenaline shot can restart your heart if it suddenly stops beating, but a new trial shows that chances are you might not return to much of a life if you survive. People who suffered cardiac arrest and were resuscitated with adrenaline had an almost doubled risk of…

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Cancer Survival Drops With Complementary Therapy: Study

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — People with curable cancers who try “complementary therapy” often refuse some part of standard care. And they may die as a result, researchers say. U.S. cancer patients increasingly use complementary medicine — a combination of standard care along with therapies that fall outside of mainstream medicine (such as…

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