A 3-Pronged Plan to Cut Type 2 Diabetes Risk

FRIDAY, July 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The type 2 diabetes tide remains unchecked in the United States, as does pre-diabetes — having a blood sugar level higher than normal, but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. A U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report found that about 30 million Americans — roughly…

Details

Where Snakebites Are Deadliest

FRIDAY, July 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Where you live in the world may determine whether you’ll survive a snakebite. About 93 million people worldwide live in remote regions where there are venomous snakes. If bitten, these folks are at increased risk of death due to limited access to anti-venom drugs, researchers said. “Understanding where…

Details

HPV Shot Eliminates Advanced Skin Cancer in 97-Year-Old

FRIDAY, July 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Two years ago, Ian McKenzie thought his mom’s remaining days were dwindling. The 97-year-old woman had developed a severe case of what was thought to be an untreatable form of squamous cell carcinoma, the second leading form of skin cancer. Lesions had developed over much of her right…

Details

Can You Eat Your Way to Better Asthma Control?

FRIDAY, July 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Need another reason to eat healthy? New evidence bolsters the notion that nutritionally rich foods might help prevent or minimize asthma. While the study couldn’t prove cause and effect, one asthma specialist said there’s certainly no downside to eating better. “The health benefits of a diet rich in…

Details

Are Concussions Tougher on Athletes With ADHD?

THURSDAY, July 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Young athletes with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) might be at higher risk of developing depression and anxiety symptoms after a concussion, a preliminary study suggests. The study, of nearly 1,000 college athletes, found those with both ADHD and a history of concussion scored higher on measures of depression and…

Details

Lyme-Bearing Ticks More Widespread in U.S. Than Thought

THURSDAY, July 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Think you live in a place that’s free from disease-carrying ticks? Don’t be so sure. Citizen scientists found ticks capable of transmitting Lyme disease and other tick-borne illnesses in dozens of places across the United States where the pests had never previously been recorded, a new study reports.…

Details

New Guidelines Mean Almost 800,000 More U.S. Kids Have High Blood Pressure

THURSDAY, July 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — There’s good news and bad news from a new report when it comes to high blood pressure among America’s children. The good news: perhaps because of better diets and use of antihypertensive medications, the percentage of kids with high blood pressure declined between 2001 and 2016, according to…

Details

Fatty Fare a Fave for 'Otzi the Iceman'

THURSDAY, July 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Otzi the Iceman had a deep love for high-fat foods, say researchers who analyzed the ancient man’s last meal. The oldest naturally preserved ice mummy was discovered in the Eastern Italian Alps in 1991. Researchers said their analysis of Otzi’s stomach contents offer important clues about the eating…

Details

AHA: Southern Diet Could Be Deadly for People With Heart Disease

THURSDAY, July 12, 2018 (American Heart Association) — People with a history of heart disease who eat a traditional Southern diet are more likely to die than those who follow a Mediterranean dietary pattern, according to new research. The large-scale study, published July 12 in the Journal of the American Heart Association, adds to the…

Details

Researchers Probe Part of Brain Where Autism Might Begin

THURSDAY, July 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The underpinnings of autism may lie in an unexpected part of the brain, a small study suggests. Scientists conducted brain scans on 20 boys with autism and 18 boys without the neurodevelopmental disorder. The scans showed that boys with autism had a significantly flatter surface on the right…

Details

For Americans, in Science They Trust

THURSDAY, July 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — While some politicians are snubbing science, the American public is choosing to do the opposite, a new study suggests. “In the context of debates regarding the loss of trust in experts, what we show is that in actual fact, when compared to a government working group, the public…

Details