Seniors, Feeling Young Is a State of Mind

WEDNESDAY, July 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For seniors who feel years younger than they really are, a new study suggests it might not be their imagination. “We found that people who feel younger have the structural characteristics of a younger brain,” explained lead author Jeanyung Chey. She is a professor in the department of…

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Quitting Smoking? Even a Little Exercise Can Help You Stay Slim

WEDNESDAY, July 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Fear of weight gain can keep many smokers from kicking the habit. But a new study involving older women might help change that: It found that for those who quit, even a bit of exercise helped keep the pounds at bay. “Being active after quitting smoking was found…

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Insurance Gaps Costly for Those With Type 1 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, July 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Gaps in private insurance coverage are common among American adults with type 1 diabetes, raising their risk for health crises, a new study finds. “Type 1 diabetes requires intensive daily management in order to simply remain alive, so interruptions to care and coverage of insulin and supplies can…

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3 Ways to Promote Healthier Eating

WEDNESDAY, July 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Eating a healthful diet is easier when nutritious foods are more accessible. But it’s not enough to simply buy better choices. To make a habit of choosing healthy over less-healthy options, you want to make them as easy to eat, as visually appealing, and as everyday as the…

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3 of 4 Black Americans Have High Blood Pressure by 55

WEDNESDAY, July 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A startling 75 percent of black people in the United States develop high blood pressure by the age of 55, a new study finds. That’s a far higher rate than seen among either white men (55 percent) or white women (40 percent), the researchers said. “We started to…

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How to Use Sunscreens the Right Way

TUESDAY, July 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Stick or spray-on sunscreens are essential tools against skin cancer, but it’s important to use them the right way, a dermatologist says. “Sticks are easy for under the eyes and the backs of the hands, while spray sunscreens are often easier to apply on children,” Dr. Debra Wattenberg…

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Scientists Get Closer to Origins of Hot Flashes

TUESDAY, July 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Researchers report that stimulating particular brain cells triggers hot flashes in mice — a discovery they hope will lead to better therapies for women going through menopause. Humans also have these brain cells, known as Kiss1 neurons, and the new study suggests they perform similar functions in humans,…

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Heat Waves Can Dull Even Young Minds, Study Says

TUESDAY, July 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — As America sweats through another summer, new research suggests that heat waves can slow the brains of even healthy young adults. In the face of extreme heat, college students living in dorms without air conditioning did worse on tests of mental skills than their cooled-off counterparts, researchers found.…

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Wearable, At-Home Patch Could Spot Your A-Fib Early

TUESDAY, July 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The common but dangerous heart rhythm disorder known as atrial fibrillation — or a-fib — can go undetected for years. Now, research suggests a high-tech, wearable patch might spot the condition early. Use of the Zio XT wireless patch, made by iRhythm, produced “an almost threefold improvement in…

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PTSD May Have Put Hearts of 9/11 First Responders at Risk

TUESDAY, July 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Working on clean-up crews after the 9/11 terrorist attack took a huge emotional toll on many first responders, and new research suggests that might have triggered heart trouble as well. Those who developed post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) faced more than double the risk of a heart attack and…

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Men's Testosterone Supplements May Be Losing Appeal

TUESDAY, July 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The “low-T” craze appears to be waning, with fewer men in the United States turning to testosterone therapy as a way to stave off aging and sexual decline. A steep decrease in testosterone prescriptions occurred between 2013 and 2016, coinciding with public warnings that hormone therapy could increase…

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Heart Risks Tied to Transwomen's Hormone Therapy

TUESDAY, July 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Transwomen who undergo hormone therapy may face higher chances of blood clots, stroke and heart attack, a new study suggests. The term transwoman refers to a woman who is designated male at birth. Some undergo hormone therapy to minimize their male characteristics and maximize female traits. “While our…

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